Dispatch: America, Location 12 Tour

91.9 WFPK Presents

Dispatch: America, Location 12 Tour

Guster, Esme Patterson

Monday, June 26, 2017

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

Iroquois Amphitheater

Louisville, KY

$20.00 - $39.50

 

$1.00 of every ticket sold will go to Artist Charity.

8 ticket purchase limit

Dispatch
Dispatch
Heralded as one of the biggest independent rock bands in history, DISPATCH officially split up in 2004 with a farewell show in Boston that drew 110,000 people and was dubbed as the largest independent music event in history (Rolling Stone). Three years later, the band came back together for three consecutive shows at New York City's Madison Square Garden in ties to their philanthropic work in Zimbabwe, becoming the first independent band to sell out the historic venue. In 2011, the band officially reunited to release new material, including a six-song EP and their first full-length studio album since 2000, Circles Around the Sun. They have since embarked on multiple sold out arena tours across the globe and are set to release their most ambitious musical effort to date Summer 2017.
Guster
Guster
"I told Swift that our last two records took a year each to make," laughs Guster's Ryan Miller. "He told me he'd never spent more than nine days on an album." The band and producer got together anyway and the result is Evermotion, an album of raw acid-soaked chamber pop, and a stylistic departure that no one saw coming.

Guster sought out Shins keyboardist/Black Keys bassist Richard Swift based on his work with Damien Jurado and Foxygen, giving themselves over to the full experience of recording at Swift's Cottage Grove, Oregon studio for three weeks in January 2014.

"It wasn't hard to figure out where we overlapped with Swift," adds percussionist/drummer Brian Rosenworcel. "It was just a matter of trusting ourselves to go big and commit. Richard is the type of artist that's always standing back and taking in the whole canvas."

With a new looseness and swagger, Guster pushes the acoustic guitars into the background, instead exploring deeper drum grooves, keyboard textures and atmospheric noise -- a language they shared easily with Swift. The band that emerged from this session sounds like one that is no longer evolving, but has evolved into something else entirely.

"Richard helped us figure out what was important about recording," says guitarist Adam Gardner. "We had just one microphone over the drum kit, used whole takes, didn't obsess over vocals or really edit things at all -- it's a raw version of our band, mistakes and all, that feels more relevant. He helped us tremendously with the big picture."

Evermotion's first single, the infectious "Simple Machine," has been hailed by TIME magazine for its "frantic beats and crawling synthesizers." The chiming lullaby of "Long Night" with its aching Ryan Miller falsetto, the shimmering "Endlessly," the distorted steel drums and Bacharach melody of "Doin' It by Myself," the a cappella Beach Boys harmonies in the gently breezy "Lazy Love," the dream-pop of "Expectation," the British Invasion beat of "Gangway," the woozy trombones and whistling of "Never Coming Down" and the Beatle-esque psychedelia of "It Is Just What It Is" shows Guster is still learning new tricks.

Since forming at Tufts University in 1992, Guster has become one of the leading indie/alternative bands, releasing seven critically acclaimed albums in 20 years, starting with Parachute in 1995. Evermotion (to be released on their own Ocho Mule label through Nettwerk Records) is the follow-up to 2010's Easy Wonderful, which earned the band its highest-ever chart debut on the Billboard 200 at #22, while reaching #2 on both the SoundScan Alternative and iTunes charts.

On Evermotion, Guster's acoustic roots are buried deep beneath the surface, almost impossible to detect, even though every song has, at its heart, an indelible melody and more than its share of tight, lethal hooks that catch and hold.

The 2010 addition of multi-instrumentalist Luke Reynolds to the core group of founding members Miller, Gardner and Rosenworcel, added immeasurably to Guster's expanding musical palette. Evermotion marks the first time that Reynolds joined for the preproduction and writing process, which took place in Rosenworcel's Brooklyn basement over 2012 and 2013. Reynolds' stamp is clear and his passion is all over the record, from his guitar melodies on "Lazy Love" to his fuzz bass on "Doin' It By Myself."

Guster's songs remain packed with hummable choruses and dense lyrical detail amid the muscular guitar riffs, clanging percussion and deceptively dark lyrics. The new album features adventurous turns on slide guitars, brassy trumpets and even a glockenspiel, with sax and trombone accompaniment by Jon Natchez, whose stints with the War on Drugs, Beirut, Passion Pit and others have led NPR to call him "indie rock's most valuable sideman."

From the start of the album, it's clear that this is a renewed band with a bolstered purpose, a band on their own vector. Evermotion introduces you to a Guster that is free, not calculated, seasoned but loose, confident in re-shaping their legacy.
Esme Patterson
Sometimes you have to turn off your brain and let your body sing. That's what Esme Patterson did on her third full-length, We Were Wild, set for release on Grand Jury Music on June 10th, 2016. "At its core, rock 'n' roll is where madness and order collide. Where our sexual, raw, animal nature meets our heart and mind. On this album I explored deeper, more far out sonic spaces. I hunted the vibe through vast wilderness," says the Portland-based songwriter.

Her decadal musical career sprang from Colorado's mountains when she co-founded Denver's beloved indie-folk ensemble Paper Bird. After four acclaimed albums and perpetual touring, Patterson set a new course. In 2012, she wove local talents, including Nathaniel Rateliff, into her first powerful, ethereal solo release All Princes, I. Her 2014 release, Woman to Woman, rounded out previously one-dimensional females from popular songs to the praise of The New York Times, The Guardian and others. "Dearly Departed," her hit collaboration with Shakey Graves led to millions of streams, sold out shows nationwide, as well as performances on Conan and The Late Show With David Letterman.

Across We Were Wild, her delicate voice, wry humor, poignant storytelling, and impassioned delivery entwine with fuzzed-out guitars, deep-in-pocket percussion, hints of roots-y country, and a swirling psychedelic hum.

"I needed to paint using more colors," she goes on. "On my past records everything was hyper realistic. I didn't overdub much or fix mistakes. Woman To Woman was basically recorded in a day, and everything was played live. In contrast, the pre-production for We Were Wild spanned over almost a year. Lyrically and musically, I went a little bit more fantasy. Groovy fantasy."

The opener "Feel Right" gallops along on a wiry riff as her voice carries an irresistible refrain. "The song is about the dissonance between the body and the mind," she explains. "You can't understand one extreme without the other. Light can't exist without dark. Until you see contrasted with the other, the two are indistinguishable. They're both necessary."

Elsewhere on the album, "Wantin' Ain't Gettin'" showcases the expanse of her dynamic voice. "No River" flows on a silky beat that gives way to Esmé's soulful delivery, while "Find It" offers up sharp introspection over a delightful groove.

"These songs reflect my life and where I am," she admits. "They also negotiate where I want to be. In the process of writing and recording We Were Wild I now see that I was subconsciously trying to give myself permission to want more, to move forward into the unknown and seek what my spirit needs."

Ultimately, Esmé progresses by embracing exactly who she is.

"I'm always transforming, renewing, living, and growing." she leaves off. "I love the way music can be a companion in life and a tool for transformation. I hope this record can act as a friend for everyone on their respective journeys. A lot of these songs were lessons my heart was giving my mind. I want to share them because maybe they can help others the way they helped me."
Venue Information:
Iroquois Amphitheater
1080 Amphitheater Road
Louisville, KY, 40214
http://www.iroquoisamphitheater.com/