Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home "Love and Comedy" Tour

Emporium, ProSim, & Kentucky Center Presents

Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home "Love and Comedy" Tour

Richard Dworsky & The Roadhounds, Aoife O'Donovan, Fred Newman

Thursday, September 07, 2017

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

Iroquois Amphitheater

Louisville, KY

$29.50 - $79.50

89.3 WFPL Presents

Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home "Love and Comedy" Tour

With Richard Dworsky & The Roadhounds, TBD, and Fred Newman

September 7, 2017 7:30pm / 6:30p Gates

 

Please note there is an 8 ticket limit per household, credit card number, phone number or email address. Patrons exceeding the ticket limit will have their order cancelled automically and without notice.

Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor
Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home Love and Comedy Tour 2017

Garrison Keillor born in Anoka, Minnesota, and began his radio career as a freshman at the University of Minnesota, from which he graduated in 1966. He went to work for Minnesota Public Radio in 1969, and from July 6, 1974 through July 1, 2016, he created and hosted his popular variety show, A Prairie Home Companion. His many books include Lake Wobegon Days, The Book of Guys, Pilgrims: A Wobegon Romance, Guy Noir and the Straight Skinny, and The Keillor Reader (Viking). He is the host of the daily program The Writer's Almanac and the editor of several anthologies of poetry, most recently, Good Poems: American Places (Viking). In 2006, Keillor played himself in the movie adaptation of his show, a film directed by Robert Altman. In 2007 he opened an independent bookstore, Common Good Books, in St. Paul, the city where he and his wife make their home.
Growing up in rural Maine, Heather Masse sang hymns and folk songs around home with her family. Now based in New York, this New England Conservatory of Music alum is a one-third of the Juno Award-winning Canadian trio The Wailin' Jennys. Lock My Heart is her recording with piano legend Dick Hyman. A new album, August Love Song - on which she joins forces with trombone great Roswell Rudd - was recently released on Red House Records.
With her ethereal voice and substantive songwriting, Aoife O'Donovan captivates fans and critics alike. She was lead singer of the string band Crooked Still and a featured vocalist on The Goat Rodeo Sessions, the Grammy-winning album by Yo-Yo Ma, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer, and Chris Thile. Her own recordings include 2016's In the Magic Hour, follow-up to her acclaimed solo debut, Fossils. Her most recent release, Man In A Neon Coat: Live From Cambridge, is a collection of original songs and covers, recorded live at The Sinclair.
Sound effects man Fred Newman is an actor, writer, musician, and sound designer for film and TV. Turns out, no one is more surprised than Fred that he's made a career out of doing what he used to do behind the teacher's back - crossing his eyes, making sounds, and doing voices. He readily admits that, growing up, he was unceremoniously removed from several classrooms, "once by my bottom lip."
RICH DWORSKY & THE ROAD HOUNDS:
Keyboardist, composer, arranger, and longtime Prairie Home Companion music director Richard Dworsky has collaborated with such diverse musicians as Yo-Yo Ma, James Taylor, Brad Paisley, Kristin Chenoweth, and Sheryl Crow. He has provided music for documentaries on HBO and PBS, and has released many recordings of original material, including his latest, All In Due Time.
Bassist Larry Kohut has played on dozens of albums and many film scores, as well as performing with jazz artists such as Patricia Barber, Mel Torme, Vincent Colaiuta, and Tony Bennett. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member at Columbia College Chicago, where he teaches acoustic and electric bass.
When Richard Kriehn turned 10, his mom bought him a mandolin; at 19, he'd won the Buck White International Mandolin Contest. He went on to play with the Nashville Mandolin Ensemble and bluegrass group 1946. On the classical side, he has performed with numerous orchestras and was principal second violin for the Washington-Idaho Symphony.
Bluegrass to big band jazz, Chris Siebold knows his way around a guitar - or a bunch of other instruments, for that matter. Based in Chicago, he draws from a deep well of influences and styles, and has put his talents to work in ensembles such as Howard Levy's Acoustic Express and Kick the Cat. In 2010, he formed the band Psycles, whose album Live at Martyrs' was released the following year.
Drummer TBA
Aoife O'Donovan
In the quiet moments found between touring her first solo album and collaborating with mainstay folk and bluegrass peers, Aoife O'Donovan found the inspiration to write her sophomore album "In the Magic Hour" — out Jan. 22, 2016 on Yep Roc Records.

"Flying, getting the rental car, eating all my meals alone…" O'Donovan says. "I just remember sitting with a book in Germany two winters ago, just feeling so happy that after the show I could have a Hefeweizen and read and not talk to anybody. And I think that gave me more time to edit my lyrics and really be more mindful with them."

The songwriting process for "In the Magic Hour" coincided with the death of O'Donovan's grandfather, at age 93. She remembers him as a "gentle soul," in the small Irish village of Clonakilty where he lived. The lyrics on "In the Magic Hour" are infused with a sense of loss and mortality's dark certainty. But the album is just as much an ode to O'Donovan's joyful childhood visits to Ireland. Aunts, uncles, grandparents and flocks of cousins would gather at the Clonakilty seaside to swim in the chilly ocean and sing together in the lingering Irish summer twilight. "In my memory it was sunny every day," O'Donovan says. "Although that definitely cannot be true."

The result of O'Donovan's days of solitude is a 10-song album full of the singer's honeyed vocals mixed with gauzy, frictionless sounds: splashing cymbals, airy harmonies, the leisurely baritone musings of an electric guitar.

O'Donovan had not yet performed many of the songs live before arranging and recording them over the course of three sessions in Tucker Martine's (The Decemberists, Neko Case), studio in Portland, OR. "The whole recording process was really Tucker [Martine] and me taking these songs and building them from the ground up," O'Donovan says. The result is deliberate but not over-done, the freshness of the material intact.

While "In The Magic Hour" rekindles the creative partnership with Grammy-nominated producer Martine, the album also highlights the fruits of O'Donovan's various career collaborations. Composer Gabriel Kahane, New York's string quartet Brooklyn Rider and musician Chris Thile all lend musical and vocal support, as well as I'm With Her band members Sara Watkins and Sarah Jarosz, plus many more.

Throughout "In the Magic Hour," O'Donovan's grandfather flits in and out like a beloved specter. His voice appears in the mournful "Donal Óg," tremulous and faraway. And the transcendent "Magpie," named for Ireland's ubiquitous birds, was written for him.

"There are flocks, but you often see just one solo bird," O'Donovan says. "And I really like that they're these creatures that have the whole sky at their disposal. You can be a loner, or you can be at the front of the V."

Flight and loneliness are enduring themes throughout "In the Magic Hour," which takes much of its inspiration from O'Donovan's itinerant lifestyle. But she finds herself reaching, again and again, for something more substantial. The songs on "In the Magic Hour" are like specks of dust floating in the tall arches of a cathedral, privy to the endless rituals of life and death and stirred occasionally by the flutter of pigeon wings. Graceful and light, they search, softly, for a place to rest.
Venue Information:
Iroquois Amphitheater
1080 Amphitheater Road
Louisville, KY, 40214
http://www.iroquoisamphitheater.com/